Berries

Generally Southern Highbush varieties are used to produce high quality fruit , though they are frequently lower yielding, very early in the season. Accordingly they are generally not used in areas where the risk of extremely low (below -5 C) temperature will put the flowering at risk.

Generally fruits in late October and November in most areas of South Africa . It is a Southern Highbush with excellent fruit quality and good travelling and holding characteristics. Though the fruit quality and size is about the best of the available cultivars the yield of this variety is rather low.
Fruits a little later than O'neal. A Souther Highbush which generally fruits about the second week of November in the warmer areas of South Africa. The fruit size is slightly smaller than O'neal , but a more vigorous and higher yielding cultivar.
A large fruited, good tasting cultivar. This variety is also more vigorous and higher yielding than O'neal fruiting late November and December. A disadvantage is a tendency to retain, in a percentage of the fruit, the stem which requires extra care on the part of the harvester to insure that all stems are removed. Despite this disadvantage its high yield and vigorous growth make it an attractive early season option.
Misty requires very little chilling and tends to fruit very early in the season, sometimes even in midwinter in the warmer areas of Southern Africa. This can be a problem when exporting as Northern hemisphere fruit is cheap and plentiful through September. But for out of season local sales and for early season fruit in areas where fruiting is not too early it is a good bet. In very cold areas the variety must be used with caution as freezing of flowers can occur if the temperatures drop below -5C.
Sharp blue was and to some extent still is the mainstay of the Australian Blueberry industry. The fruit is large though the taste is rather average. The plant however is extremely vigorous and the yield is high and precocious. In Australia the plant produces several flushes of fruit a year making it virtually a year round producer in the warmer areas of that country. The plants are only recently available in South Africa so our experience is somewhat limited here.

Northern Highbush varieties frequently produce very good quality fruit , generally somewhat lower yielding than many rabbiteye varieties. They flower later than most Southern Highbush varieties and are generally more adapted to the cooler areas of the country.

Good early season Northern Highbush varieties. They have excellent fruit size and quality but require more chilling. They are only suitable for the colder areas of the country.
Usually considered one of the best early Rabbiteye cultivars. It fruits in late November / early December despite flowering quite late (September). The good quality fruit and late flowering, though early fruiting, makes this a very desirable early season cultivar. Marketing the fruit of rabbiteye varieties can be challenging in a fussy international market as the quality tends to be a bit lower than many Highbush varieties. The very high yields , partially offset this criticism and makes them the cultivars of choice for processing markets. Rabbiteye cultivars all require cross pollinators.
are all good early season cross pollinators for Premier.
A "Universal Pollinator". The long flowering period of Southland makes it a good pollinator for any Rabbiteye. If unsure of how a pollinator will work in your area, include a few Southland to be certain.
are the best midseason cultivars. Fruiting peaks in January.
an excellent cross pollinator for Choice and Tifblue. Fruit only suitable for processing.
The best late season Rabbiteye. Use Southland, Tifblue, Choice and Homebelle as cross pollinators.
A new variety in South Africa reported to have good eating quality, high yield and good size.
A very high yielding variety with good quality fruit. Yields of up to 20 tons per hectare, have been reported (anecdotal ) in Chile.
The latest of all blueberry cultivars. This is a Northern Highbush generally producing in February/March. The fruit is of reasonable quality and notable for it's ability to store under controlled atmosphere for 60 days plus.
Plants are as bare root canes or in pots . For PBR protected varieties royalties will be added to the base price. Bare root canes are only available June-August. Two major types of Raspberries exist; Flurocane varieties which fruit on the second years wood after receiving sufficient chilling and Primocane varieties which fruit and the first years growth .
A primocane cultivar bearing on the first years growth and requiring no chilling in winter. The fruit is famous for its long shelf life and "good legs". One of the major export cultivars. Fruiting is in February and plant growth is semi-erect, requiring only a two strand trellis. Yield is improved with added chilling.
A flurocane cultivar requiring about 700 hours of chilling in winter. The fruit is large and very firm with good "legs" and shelf life. Flavour average. A good export cultivar. Fruits in December. Semi-erect, two strand trellis.
A florocane berry requiring about 600 hours of chilling in winter. Excellent fruit flavour and large fruit size. Fruits late October to November. Semi-erect, two strand trellis. Fruit is a bit too soft to export well.
A florocane berry requiring about 700 hours of chilling in winter. Fruits just after Glen Moy in November to December. The fruit is of good flavour and travels well. Semi-erect.
A florocane cultivar requiring about 700 hours of chilling with a very good shelf life. Flavour is good. Fruits in Dec-Jan.
A processing flora cane variety with high quality fruit and a good yield. A source of High concentrations of antioxidants. Reputed to be of value in Cancer prevention.
Plants are as bare root canes or in pots . For PBR protected varieties royalties will be added to the base price. Bare root canes are only available June-August. Two major types of Raspberries exist; Flurocane varieties which fruit on the second years wood after receiving sufficient chilling and Primocane varieties which fruit and the first years growth .
The earliest blackberry cultivar, usually setting fruit by early Nov. It requires less than 600 hours chilling in winter. The plant growth is upright and it requires little or no trellising. The fruit quality is good and travels well. It is not a thornless cultivar. The cultivar was developed at the University of Arkansas and it is PBR protected.
The thornless sister of Choct aw. Good quality fruit. Fewer problems with red drooplet than other cultivars, accordingly a better export product than most. One to two weeks later that Choctaw.
A very early thornless cultivar. Good yield of high quality fruit.
The canes require about 700-800 hours chilling in winter. The fruit is of good size, excellent flavour and travels well. Fruiting is in December to January. A variety developed at the Scottish Research Institute and is PBR protected in RSA. Requires 3-4 strand trellis.
Laxton Number 1 and Junifer. Sold bareroot.
Tifon bareroot.
Pixwell. Sold in pots.

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